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J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Jun;55(6):605-13. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182917899.

Effects of occupational role conflict and emotional demands on subsequent psychological distress: a 3-year follow-up study of the general working population in Norway.

Author information

1
National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. hajo@stami.no

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the impact of occupational role conflict and emotional demands on subsequent psychological distress.

METHODS:

A randomly drawn cohort from the general Norwegian working-age population was followed up for 3 years (n = 12,550; response rate = 67%). Eligible respondents were in paid work during the reference week in 2006 and 2009 or temporarily absent from such work (n = 6,745; response rate = 68%).

RESULTS:

In the fully adjusted model, both high role conflict (odds ratios = 1.53; 95% CI = 1.15 to 2.03) and high emotional demands (odds ratios = 1.38; 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.69) were significant predictors of psychological distress. Additional significant predictors were low job control, bullying/harassment, and job insecurity (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Considering all of the evaluated work-related factors, role conflict and emotional demands contributed the most to the population risk of developing psychological distress.

PMID:
23722939
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182917899
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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