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J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2013 Aug 15;63(5):609-16. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e31829d63ab.

Evaluating sleep and cognition in HIV.

Author information

1
*Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; †Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD; ‡Departments of Pathology, Epidemiology, and Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; and §Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relationship between measures of sleep quality and cognitive performance in HIV-positive individuals stable on combination antiretroviral therapy.

DESIGN:

Multimethod assessments of sleep quality, patterns, and cognitive performance were assessed in a predominantly black HIV-positive cohort.

METHODS:

Sleep quality and patterns were characterized in 36 subjects by polysomnogram, 2-week actigraphy monitoring, and validated sleep questionnaires. Cognitive performance was assessed with a battery of neuropsychological tests.

RESULTS:

The majority of participants were cognitively impaired [based on Frascati (75%) criteria]. Self-reported mean scores on the Pittsburgh sleep quality index and the insomnia severity scale suggested poor sleep quality. Better cognitive performance, particularly on tasks of attention, frontal/executive function, and psychomotor/motor speed, was associated with polysomnogram sleep indices (ie, reduced wake after sleep onset, greater sleep efficiency, greater sleep latency, and greater total sleep time). Thirty-seven percent of participants had sleep patterns suggestive of chronic partial sleep deprivation, which was associated with significantly worse performance on the digit symbol test (P = 0.006), nondominant pegboard (P = 0.043), and verbal fluency tests (P = 0.044).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that compromised sleep quality and duration may have a significant impact on cognitive performance in HIV-positive individuals. Future studies are warranted to determine the utility of sleep quality and quantity indices as potential predictive biomarkers for development and progression of future HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.

Comment in

PMID:
23722610
PMCID:
PMC3822901
DOI:
10.1097/QAI.0b013e31829d63ab
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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