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J Thorac Oncol. 2013 Jul;8(7):959-66. doi: 10.1097/JTO.0b013e318292c41e.

A prospective phase II trial of induction chemotherapy with docetaxel/cisplatin for Masaoka stage III/IV thymic epithelial tumors.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Initial complete resection is a powerful prognostic indicator of survival in thymic epithelial tumors (TETs), but is obviously related to tumor stage. Here, we report the results of a prospective study of neoadjuvant docetaxel/cisplatin in locally advanced TETs.

METHODS:

Patients with histologically proven, Masaoka stage III/IV TETs at presentation were enrolled in this open-label, phase II, nonrandomized study. Patients received docetaxel 75 mg/m² I.V, followed by cisplatin 75 mg/m² I.V on day 1 of every 3-week cycle. After three cycles, surgical resection was performed if the tumor was considered resectable.

RESULTS:

From March 2007 to July 2011, 27 patients were enrolled in the trial. Masaoka stage at presentation was III (n = 8; 29.6%), IVA (n = 17; 63.0%), and IVB (n = 2; 7.4%). Histologic types were nine thymomas (33.3%) and 18 thymic carcinomas (66.7%). After completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 17 patients (63.0%) achieved partial response and 10 (37.0%) had stable disease. Nineteen patients (70.4%) underwent surgery and eight did not because of surgeons' decision (n = 5), patient refusal (n = 2), or decision to undergo radiation therapy instead (n = 1). Fifteen among the 19 patients achieved complete resection (78.9%), which yields 55.6% of complete resection rate with intent-to-treat analysis. The most common side effects of severity greater than grade 3 were neutropenia and diarrhea. With a median follow-up of 42.6 months, 4-year overall survival, and progression-free survival in all patients was 79.4 and 40.6%, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Neoadjuvant docetaxel/cisplatin is both feasible and well tolerated, and potentially improves surgical resectability in patients with advanced TETs.

PMID:
23722169
DOI:
10.1097/JTO.0b013e318292c41e
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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