Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Dev Neurosci. 2013 Nov;31(7):525-42. doi: 10.1016/j.ijdevneu.2013.05.007. Epub 2013 May 27.

Mapping connectivity in the developing brain.

Author information

1
Imaging Genetics Center, Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, UCLA School of Medicine, 635 Charles Young Drive South, Suite 225, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7334, USA. Electronic address: eldennis@ucla.edu.

Abstract

Recently, there has been a wealth of research into structural and functional brain connectivity, and how they change over development. While we are far from a complete understanding, these studies have yielded important insights into human brain development. There is an ever growing variety of methods for assessing connectivity, each with its own advantages. Here we review research on the development of structural and/or functional brain connectivity in both typically developing subjects and subjects with neurodevelopmental disorders. Space limitations preclude an exhaustive review of brain connectivity across all developmental disorders, so we review a representative selection of recent findings on brain connectivity in autism, Fragile X, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Williams syndrome, Turner syndrome, and ADHD. Major strides have been made in understanding the developmental trajectory of the human connectome, offering insight into characteristic features of brain development and biological processes involved in developmental brain disorders. We also discuss some common themes, including hemispheric specialization - or asymmetry - and sex differences. We conclude by discussing some promising future directions in connectomics, including the merger of imaging and genetics, and a deeper investigation of the relationships between structural and functional connectivity.

KEYWORDS:

22q11.2 DS; ADHD; Autism; Brain connectivity; DTI; Development; Fragile X; HARDI; Turner syndrome; Williams syndrome; rs-fMRI

Republished in

PMID:
23722009
PMCID:
PMC3800504
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijdevneu.2013.05.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center