Format

Send to

Choose Destination
World J Gastroenterol. 2013 May 28;19(20):3062-8. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v19.i20.3062.

Glucomannan for abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders in children: a randomized trial.

Author information

1
Andrea Horvath, Piotr Dziechciarz, Hania Szajewska, Department of Paediatrics, the Medical University of Warsaw, Dzialdowska 1, Poland. andrea.hania@gmail.com

Abstract

AIM:

To assess the efficacy of glucomannan (GNN) as the sole treatment for abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs).

METHODS:

We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Patients were recruited among children referred to the Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Warsaw. Included in the study were children aged 7-17 years with abdominal pain-related FGIDs classified according to the Rome III diagnostic criteria. The children were randomly assigned to receive GNN, a polysaccharide of 1,4-D-glucose and D-mannose, a soluble fiber from the Japanese Konjac plant, at a dosage of 2.52 g/d (1 sachet of 1.26 g 2 times a day), or a comparable placebo (maltodextrin) at the same dosage. The content of each sachet was dissolved in approximately 125 mL of fluid and was consumed twice daily for 4 wk.

RESULTS:

Of the 89 eligible children, 84 (94%) completed the study. "No pain" and "treatment success" (defined as no pain or a decrease ≥ 2/6 points on the FACES Pain Scale Revised) were similar in the GNN (n = 41) and placebo (n = 43) groups [no pain (12/41 vs 6/43, respectively; RR = 2.1, 95%CI: 0.87-5.07) as well as treatment success (23/41 vs 20/43; RR = 1.2, 95%CI: 0.79-1.83)]. No significant differences between the groups were observed in the secondary outcomes, such as abdominal cramps, abdominal bloating/gassiness, episodes of nausea or vomiting, or a changed in stool consistency. GNN demonstrated no significant influence on the number of children requiring rescue therapy, school absenteeism, or daily activities.

CONCLUSION:

In our setting, GNN, as dosed in this study, was no more effective than the placebo in achieving therapeutic success in the management of FGIDs in children.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01495806.

KEYWORDS:

Abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders; Children; Functional abdominal pain

PMID:
23716985
PMCID:
PMC3662945
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v19.i20.3062
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center