Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Pharm Educ. 2013 May 13;77(4):75. doi: 10.5688/ajpe77475.

Perceptions of pharmacy students, faculty members, and administrators on the use of technology in the classroom.

Author information

1
School of Pharmacy, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA. m.divall@neu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To gather and evaluate the perceptions of students, faculty members, and administrators regarding the frequency and appropriateness of classroom technology use.

METHODS:

Third-year pharmacy students and faculty members at 6 colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed to assess their perceptions about the type, frequency, and appropriateness of using technology in the classroom. Upper-level administrators and information technology professionals were also interviewed to ascertain overall technology goals and identify criteria used to adopt new classroom technologies.

RESULTS:

Four hundred sixty-six students, 124 faculty members, and 12 administrators participated in the survey. The most frequently used and valued types of classroom technology were course management systems, audience response systems, and lecture capture. Faculty members and students agreed that faculty members appropriately used course management systems and audience response systems. Compared with their counterparts, tech-savvy, and male students reported significantly greater preference for increased use of classroom technology. Eighty-six percent of faculty members reported having changed their teaching methodologies to meet student needs, and 91% of the students agreed that the use of technology met their needs.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pharmacy colleges and schools use a variety of technologies in their teaching methods, which have evolved to meet the needs of the current generation of students. Students are satisfied with the appropriateness of technology, but many exhibit preferences for even greater use of technology in the classroom.

KEYWORDS:

administrators; educational technology; faculty; perceptions; students

PMID:
23716743
PMCID:
PMC3663629
DOI:
10.5688/ajpe77475
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center