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Menopause. 2013 Jun;20(6):631-9. doi: 10.1097/GME.0b013e31827c5c45.

Disruptions in ovarian function are related to depression and cardiometabolic risk during premenopause.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0848, USA. maria.bleil@ucsf.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which mild disruptions in ovarian function, indexed by changes in menstrual cycle length, may relate to cardiometabolic and psychological health in premenopausal women.

METHODS:

Among 804 healthy, regularly cycling women (aged 25-45 y; mean [SD] age, 35.5 [5.5] y), patterns of any change (shortening, lengthening, or increased variability) versus no change in menstrual cycle length were examined in relation to a composite of cardiometabolic risk and individual risk factors (high-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, waist circumference, glucose, and hypertensive status), as well as in relation to depression indicators (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale score ≥16 [yes/no], lifetime depression diagnosis [yes/no], and lifetime antidepressant medication use [yes/no]). Models were also explored to test whether changes in menstrual cycle length mediated relations between depression history and cardiometabolic risk.

RESULTS:

In covariate-adjusted models compared with no change, any change in menstrual cycle length was associated with higher cardiometabolic risk composite scores and lower high-density lipoprotein (P < 0.05). In addition, compared with no change, any change in menstrual cycle length was associated with a Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale score of 16 or higher, having received a depression diagnosis, and having used antidepressant medications (P < 0.05). In exploratory analyses, any change in menstrual cycle length partially mediated the relation between depression history and cardiometabolic risk (b = 0.152, P = 0.040), which attenuated (b = 0.129, P = 0.083) when any change in menstrual cycle length was covaried.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings suggest that disruptions in ovarian function, marked by subtle changes in menstrual cycle length, may relate to aspects of cardiometabolic and psychological health among healthy, premenopausal women.

PMID:
23715377
PMCID:
PMC3657585
DOI:
10.1097/GME.0b013e31827c5c45
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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