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Cutan Ocul Toxicol. 2014 Mar;33(1):60-2. doi: 10.3109/15569527.2013.797907. Epub 2013 May 28.

Vitamin D status in patients with rosacea.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Mustafa Kemal University, Tayfur Ata Sokmen Medical School , Hatay , Turkey .

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Rosacea is a common chronic skin condition affecting the face. In recent years, significant evidence shows that vitamin D plays an important role in modulating the immune system. Vitamin D and its analogues via these mechanisms are playing an increasing role in the management of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo, acne and rosacea.

OBJECTIVES:

In our study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between serum vitamin D levels in patients with rosacea and analyze the association of vitamin D with clinical features.

METHODS:

Forty-four rosacea patients and 32 healthy control subjects were included into the study. 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), calcium and intact parathyroid hormone were measured. Deficiency of vitamin D is defined as the level of 25(OH)D being less than 20 ng/ml.

RESULTS:

Thirty-three female and 11 male patients were included in the study. The mean age of patients was 48.6 ± 11.5. The mean levels of vitamin D levels were found as 21.4 ± 9.9 and 17.1 ± 7.9 in patients and controls, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.04). The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with rosacea was 38.6% and 28.1% in healthy controls (p = 0.34).

CONCLUSIONS:

To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first study for evaluating serum vitamin D levels of patients with rosacea in the literature. Patients with rosacea have relatively high serum vitamin D levels compared to control groups. The result of our study suggests that increased vitamin D levels may lead to the development of rosacea. To confirm status of vitamin D levels in patients with rosacea, larger epidemiological studies are needed.

PMID:
23713748
DOI:
10.3109/15569527.2013.797907
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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