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Physiother Theory Pract. 2013 Jul;29(5):371-8. doi: 10.3109/09593985.2012.734009.

Improved function in women with persistent pregnancy-related pelvic pain after a single corticosteroid injection to the ischiadic spine: a randomized double-blind controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine Unit, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. thomas.torstensson@pubcare.uu.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pregnancy-related low back and pelvic pain is a worldwide problem. A large proportion of women still experience disabling daily back pain 2 years after childbirth, resulting in major changes in activities and general well-being. In spite of this, the source of pain and effective treatment are uncertain.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the short-term effects on function of a single corticosteroid injection treatment to the ischiadic spine in women with persistent pregnancy-related pelvic pain (PPPP).

METHODS:

Thirty-six women were allocated to injection treatment with slow-release triamcinolone and lidocain or saline and lidocain, given once at the sacrospinous ligament insertion on the ischiadic spine bilaterally with follow-up at 4 weeks. Outcome measures were Disability Rating Index (DRI), self-rated functional health (SF-36), gait speed and endurance (6MWT), and strength and endurance of trunk muscles (isometric trunk extensor and flexor tests).

RESULTS:

Women in the triamcinolone group showed significantly improved DRI (p  =  0.046), 6MWT (p  =  0.016), and isometric trunk extensor tests (p  =  0.004), as compared with the saline group. Close co-variation was shown between improved function and reduced pain intensity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Improved function was achieved among women with PPPP after a single injection treatment with slow-release corticosteroid. The effect was positively correlated to the reduced pain intensity.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00757016.

PMID:
23713407
DOI:
10.3109/09593985.2012.734009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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