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Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2014 Jan;45(1):108-13. doi: 10.1093/ejcts/ezt275. Epub 2013 May 27.

Preoperative red cell distribution width in patients undergoing pulmonary resections for non-small-cell lung cancer.

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1
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, Liverpool, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Red cell distribution width (RDW) has been identified as an independent risk factor with regard to prognosis in patients with cardiac disease. We sought to investigate the association of RDW in patients undergoing lung resections for non-small-cell lung cancer with respect to in-hospital morbidity, mortality and long-term survival.

METHODS:

Analysis of consecutive patients on a validated prospective thoracic surgery database was performed for those undergoing potentially curative resections at a single institution. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed for postoperative invasive and non-invasive ventilation, superficial wound infections, length of hospital stay, in-hospital mortality and long-term survival.

RESULTS:

Overall mortality was 1.9% for all cases (n = 917). The median follow-up was 6.8 years. Univariate analysis demonstrated that RDW has a significant effect on hospital length of stay (P < 0.001), in-hospital mortality rates (P < 0.001), postoperative invasive and non-invasive ventilation (P < 0.001), superficial wound infections (P = 0.06) and long-term survival (P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that RDW is a significant factor determining postoperative invasive and non-invasive ventilation, superficial wound infections, length of hospital stay, in-hospital mortality and long-term survival. Confounding factor analysis revealed that in the absence of anaemia, RDW was still a significant factor in the above analysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

RDW is a significant factor after risk adjustment, determining in-hospital morbidity, mortality and long-term survival in patients post-potentially curative resections for non-small-cell lung cancer. Further work is needed to elucidate the exact mechanism of RDW impact on in-hospital morbidity, mortality and long-term survival. We speculate that subtle bone marrow dysfunction may be an issue.

KEYWORDS:

Lung cancer; Mortality; Red cell distribution width; Survival

Comment in

PMID:
23711463
DOI:
10.1093/ejcts/ezt275
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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