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Mol Cells. 2013 May;35(5):371-80. doi: 10.1007/s10059-013-0135-5. Epub 2013 May 16.

Phytochrome-interacting factors have both shared and distinct biological roles.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701, Korea.

Abstract

Phytochromes are plant photoreceptors that perceive red and far-red light. Upon the perception of light in Arabidopsis, light-activated phytochromes enter the nucleus and act on a set of interacting proteins, modulating their activities and thereby altering the expression levels of ∼10% of the organism's entire gene complement. Phytochromeinteracting factors (PIFs) belonging to Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) subgroup 15 are key interacting proteins that play negative roles in light responses. Their activities are post-translationally countered by light-activated phytochromes, which promote the degradation of PIFs and directly or indirectly inhibit their binding to DNA. The PIFs share a high degree of similarity, but examinations of pif single and multiple mutants have indicated that they have shared and distinct functions in various developmental and physiological processes. These are believed to stem from differences in both intrinsic protein properties and their gene expression patterns. In an effort to clarify the basis of these shared and distinct functions, we compared recently published genome-wide ChIP data, developmental gene expression maps, and responses to various stimuli for the various PIFs. Based on our observations, we propose that the biological roles of PIFs stem from their shared and distinct DNA binding targets and specific gene expression patterns.

PMID:
23708772
PMCID:
PMC3887866
DOI:
10.1007/s10059-013-0135-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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