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PLoS One. 2013 May 20;8(5):e63937. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0063937. Print 2013.

Munc18c in adipose tissue is downregulated in obesity and is associated with insulin.

Author information

1
Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Joan XXIII University Hospital, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Munc18c is associated with glucose metabolism and could play a relevant role in obesity. However, little is known about the regulation of Munc18c expression. We analyzed Munc18c gene expression in human visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue and its relationship with obesity and insulin.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We evaluated 70 subjects distributed in 12 non-obese lean subjects, 23 overweight subjects, 12 obese subjects and 23 nondiabetic morbidly obese patients (11 with low insulin resistance and 12 with high insulin resistance).

RESULTS:

The lean, overweight and obese persons had a greater Munc18c gene expression in adipose tissue than the morbidly obese patients (p<0.001). VAT Munc18c gene expression was predicted by the body mass index (B = -0.001, p = 0.009). In SAT, no associations were found by different multiple regression analysis models. SAT Munc18c gene expression was the main determinant of the improvement in the HOMA-IR index 15 days after bariatric surgery (B = -2148.4, p = 0.038). SAT explant cultures showed that insulin produced a significant down-regulation of Munc18c gene expression (p = 0.048). This decrease was also obtained when explants were incubated with liver X receptor alpha (LXRα) agonist, either without (p = 0.038) or with insulin (p = 0.050). However, Munc18c gene expression was not affected when explants were incubated with insulin plus a sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) inhibitor (p = 0.504).

CONCLUSIONS:

Munc18c gene expression in human adipose tissue is down-regulated in morbid obesity. Insulin may have an effect on the Munc18c expression, probably through LXRα and SREBP-1c.

PMID:
23700440
PMCID:
PMC3659121
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0063937
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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