Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Contraception. 2013 Oct;88(4):532-8. doi: 10.1016/j.contraception.2013.04.002. Epub 2013 Apr 18.

Racial and ethnic differences in men's knowledge and attitudes about contraception.

Author information

1
Center for Research on Health Care, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Center for Health Equity, Research, and Promotion, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Electronic address: borrerosp@upmc.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little is known about racial/ethnic differences in men's contraceptive knowledge and attitudes.

STUDY DESIGN:

We used multivariable logistic regression to examine racial/ethnic differences in contraceptive knowledge and attitudes among 903 men aged 18-29 in the 2009 National Survey of Reproductive and Contraceptive Knowledge.

RESULTS:

Black and Hispanic men were less likely than Whites to have heard of most contraceptive methods, including female and male sterilization, and also had lower knowledge about hormonal and long-acting reversible methods. They were less likely to know that pills are ineffective when 2-3 pills are missed [Blacks: adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=0.42; Hispanics: aOR=0.53] and that fertility was not delayed after stopping the pill (Blacks: aOR=0.52; Hispanics: aOR=0.27). Hispanics were less likely to know that nulliparous women can use the intrauterine device (aOR=0.47). Condom knowledge was similar by race/ethnicity, but Blacks were less likely to view condoms as a hassle than Whites (aOR=0.46).

CONCLUSIONS:

Efforts to educate men, especially men of color, about contraceptive methods are needed.

KEYWORDS:

Attitudes; Contraception; Disparities; Knowledge; Men; Race

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center