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J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc. 2012 Dec;1(4):268-77. doi: 10.1093/jpids/pis058. Epub 2012 Jun 22.

Laboratory-Confirmed Rotavirus Disease in Utah Children: Clinical and Economic Impact of Rotavirus Vaccination.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City Chris.Stockmann@hsc.utah.edu.
2
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Rotavirus is the most common cause of infectious diarrhea in children worldwide. Recent studies have described changes in the burden of all-cause gastroenteritis; however, there are limited data on the clinical and economic impact of rotavirus vaccine on cases of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus disease.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective study of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus disease from July 2003 through June 2010 at a children's hospital and a community hospital in Utah. Demographics and hospital costs for children <5 years with rotavirus symptoms and a positive rotavirus enzyme immunoassay test on a stool specimen were abstracted from electronic medical records. We compared the prevaccine period (2003-2007) with the postvaccine period (2008-2010).

RESULTS:

The overall incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis declined in the postvaccine period, from 26.6 to 5.2 cases per 10 000 person-years for Salt Lake County residents. The largest decrease in the incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis was among children <12 months (-87%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 79-93). Older children (12-23 months) also experienced significant decreases (-81%; 95% CI, 72-88), as did those 24-59 months (-61%; 95% CI, 51-71). In 2009, 3 years after rotavirus vaccine introduction, there was a 79% decrease in emergency department visits and a 78% decrease in hospitalizations across both hospitals. The cost of emergency department visits and hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis decreased by 79% and 72%, respectively, resulting in annual savings of $790 000 at a children's hospital and $140 000 at a community hospital.

CONCLUSION:

Rotavirus vaccination in infants has dramatically decreased the clinical burden and direct medical costs of rotavirus gastroenteritis in both infants and young children.

KEYWORDS:

Acute Gastroenteritis; Hospital Costs; Immunization; Incidence; Pediatrics

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