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J Clin Lab Anal. 2013 May;27(3):177-80. doi: 10.1002/jcla.21579.

Moderate-intensity single exercise session does not induce renal damage.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to determine whether a single moderate-intensity exercise session induces renal injury based on various parameters that reflect kidney dysfunction, including urinary L-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP).

METHODS:

Adult outpatients (n = 31) with chronic kidney disease (CKD) not receiving renal replacement therapy participated in this study. Urine was collected before and after a single 20-min moderate-intensity exercise session. Urinary levels of L-FABP, albumin, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG), and α1-microglobrin (α1MG) were measured. In addition, 12 patients with estimated glomerular filtration fraction less than 30 ml/min/1.73 ml(2) were selected from all patients and evaluated using the same analysis.

RESULTS:

Urinary values of L-FABP, albumin, NAG, and α1MG did not increase significantly after exercise compared with before exercise (urinary L-FABP, from 8.3 to 9.4 μg/g of creatinine; urinary albumin, from 293.1 to 333.7 mg/g of creatinine; urinary NAG, from 9.2 to 8.2 U/g of creatinine; urinary α1MG, from 11.4 to 9.8 mg/g of creatinine, not significant). Similar findings were seen in all patients, regardless of degree of renal dysfunction.

CONCLUSIONS:

A single session of moderate-intensity exercise was not associated with an increase in renal parameters used to assess renal damage.

PMID:
23686775
DOI:
10.1002/jcla.21579
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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