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Oncogene. 2013 Nov 28;32(48):5492-500. doi: 10.1038/onc.2013.158. Epub 2013 May 20.

SATB1 collaborates with loss of p16 in cellular transformation.

Author information

1
1] Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, Epigenetics of Cancer and Aging Laboratory, Montevideo, Uruguay [2] Research Institute of Molecular Pathology, Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

Tumor progression is associated with invasiveness and metastatic potential. The special AT-rich binding protein 1 (SATB1) has been identified as a key factor in the progression of breast cancer cells to a malignant phenotype and is associated with progression of human tumors. In normal development, SATB1 coordinates gene expression of progenitor cells by functioning as a genome organizer. In contrast to progenitor and tumor cells, SATB1 expression in nontransformed cells is not compatible with proliferation. Here we show that SATB1 expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts induces cell cycle arrest and senescence that is associated with elevated p16 protein levels. Deletion of p16 overcomes the SATB1-induced senescence. We further provide evidence for an interaction of SATB1 with the retinoblastoma (RB)/E2F pathway downstream of p16. A combined deletion of the RB proteins, RB, p107 and p130 (triple-mutant; TM), prevents SATB1-induced G1 arrest, which is restored upon the reintroduction of RB into SATB1-expressing TM fibroblasts. SATB1 interacts with the E2F/RB complex and regulates the cyclin E promoter in an E2F-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that p16 and the RB/E2F pathway are critical for SATB1-induced cell cycle arrest. In the absence of p16, SATB1 causes anchorage-independent growth and invasive phenotype in fibroblasts. Our data illustrate that p16 mutations collaborate with the oncogenic activity of SATB1. Consistent with our finding, a literature survey shows that deletion of p16 is generally associated with SATB1 expressing human cell lines and tumors.

PMID:
23686316
PMCID:
PMC3898308
DOI:
10.1038/onc.2013.158
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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