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J Pediatr Urol. 2013 Dec;9(6 Pt B):1137-44. doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2013.04.011. Epub 2013 May 17.

Reduced bacterial colonisation of the glans penis after male circumcision in children--a prospective study.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatric and Adolescent Surgery, Salzburg University Hospital, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg, Austria. Electronic address: hannah.ladenhauf@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effect of male circumcision on the bacterial colonisation of the glans penis in children.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

244 males were included in this study. The study group consisted of 143 boys admitted for circumcision between August 2009 and July 2010. Periurethral swabs were taken preoperatively and one week postoperatively. The control group included 101 boys without phimosis, in which only one swab was taken. Patients were subgrouped according to age below and above five years. Bacterial cultures were analysed, results were categorized by non-uropathogenic and uropathogenic bacteria, and compared within and between groups.

RESULTS:

Patients in both control group and study group before circumcision showed significant bacterial colonisation (>98%), involving known uropathogenic bacteria in over 86%. After circumcision, bacterial colonisation dropped from 100% to 86.3% (p < 0.005) in boys younger than five years and from 98.57% to 77.14% (p < 0.001) in those aged five or above, respectively. Moreover, the fraction of uropathogenic bacteria decreased significantly.

CONCLUSION:

Male circumcision significantly reduces the bacterial colonisation of the glans penis with regard to both non-uropathogenic and uropathogenic bacteria.

KEYWORDS:

Bacterial; Children; Circumcision; Colonisation; Foreskin; Male

PMID:
23685114
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpurol.2013.04.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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