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J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2014 Jan;27(2):182-6. doi: 10.3109/14767058.2013.806901. Epub 2013 Jun 20.

Breast feeding and immunoprophylaxis efficacy of mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus.

Author information

1
Department of infectious diseases, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University , China .

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study was designed to explore if hepatitis B virus (HBV) may be transmitted via breast milk through mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), and assay the immunoprophylaxis efficacy after passive-active immunization.

METHOD:

From year 2008 to 2012, 67,720 pregnant women were screened and 1186 HBsAg-carrier mothers and their infants aged 8-12 months were followed in multi-centers of China, among whom HBV markers (HBsAg, HBsAb, HBeAg, HBeAb and HBcAb) and HBV-DNA were measured.

RESULTS:

HBsAg positive rate of pregnant women was 6.7% (4533/67,720) and infants' immunoprophylaxis failure rate was 3.3% (39/1186). Immunoprophylaxis failure infants were all born to mothers of HBeAg positive and HBV-DNA >6 log10 copies/ml. Among infants of HBeAg positive mothers, HBV infection rate was 9.0% and HBsAg positive rate was 8.3% in breast-feeding group versus 9.2% in formula-feeding group, P=0.761. Occurrence of perinatal HBV infection was indicated in uterus or during delivery. Different feeding patterns had no effects on HBsAb conversion of infants with the implementation of immunization.

CONCLUSIONS:

HBsAg prevalence rate of pregnant women enrolled was 6.7% and immunoprophylaxis failure rate of infants was 3.3%, while the infection rate reached 9.0% in infants of HBeAg positive mothers. Breast feeding did not increase the occurrence of HBV MTCT.

PMID:
23682864
DOI:
10.3109/14767058.2013.806901
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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