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Rheumatology (Oxford). 2013 Sep;52(9):1572-82. doi: 10.1093/rheumatology/ket189. Epub 2013 May 16.

Glycosylation status of serum in inflammatory arthritis in response to anti-TNF treatment.

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  • 1Department of Rheumatology, Dublin Academic Medical Centre, Dublin 4, Ireland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Glycosylation is the most common post-translational modification and is altered in disease. The typical glycosylation change in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) is a decrease in galactosylation levels on IgG. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of anti-TNF therapy on whole serum glycosylation from IA patients and determine whether these alterations in the glycome change upon treatment of the disease.

METHODS:

Serum samples were collected from 54 IA patients before treatment and at 1 and 12 months after commencing anti-TNF therapy. N-linked glycans from whole serum samples were analysed using a high-throughput hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-based method.

RESULTS:

Glycosylation on the serum proteins of IA patients changed significantly with anti-TNF treatment. We observed an increase in galactosylated glycans from IgG, also an increase in core-fucosylated biantennary galactosylated glycans and a decrease in sialylated triantennary glycans with and without outer arm fucose. This increase in galactosylated IgG glycans suggests a reversing of the N-glycome towards normal healthy profiles. These changes are strongly correlated with decreasing CRP, suggesting a link between glycosylation changes and decreases in inflammatory processes.

CONCLUSION:

Glycosylation changes in the serum of IA patients on anti-TNF therapy are strongly associated with a decrease in inflammatory processes and reflect the effect of anti-TNF on the immune system.

KEYWORDS:

CRP; IgG-GO; N-glycosylation; anti-TNF therapy; galactosylation; inflammation; inflammatory arthritis; psoriatic arthritis; rheumatoid arthritis; sialylation

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