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Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2014 Mar;231(6):1011-21. doi: 10.1007/s00213-013-3140-7. Epub 2013 May 17.

Pharmacological treatments prescribed to people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in primary health care.

Author information

1
Centre for Paediatric Pharmacy Research, Department of Practice and Policy, UCL School of Pharmacy, University College London, London, UK, macey.murray@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) affect 1 % of children, having significant impact on health and social outcomes. Psychotropic medication use by individuals with ASD in the USA increased over time, and polypharmacy occurred in >50 % of those prescribed. In the UK, no psychotropic drugs are approved in ASDs, and little is known about patterns of pharmacological treatment in the ASD population and associated co-morbidities.

METHODS:

We used The Health Improvement Network, a nationally representative primary care database, to assess the prevalence of ASD diagnoses, psychotropic drug prescribing and neuropsychiatric co-morbidities of 0-24 year olds between 1992 and 2008.

RESULTS:

ASD prevalence increased 65-fold from 0.01 % (1992) to 0.50 % (2008). Psychotropic drugs were prescribed to 29 % (1,619/5,651) of the ASD cohort; the most prescribed drugs were sleep medication (9.7 % of prescribed patients), psychostimulants (7.9 %) and antipsychotics (7.3 %). More patients were given psychostimulants and sleep medications over time from 1.5-6.3 % and 2.2-5.9 % respectively. Thirty-seven per cent of the cohort had ≥ 1 record of a neuropsychiatric co-morbidity, the most common being developmental difficulties and learning disabilities (12.6 %), behavioural, conduct and personality disorders (11.1 %) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (7.5 %).

CONCLUSIONS:

British physicians are more conservative in prescribing practice than American colleagues. However, use of psychostimulants and antipsychotics is much higher in those with ASD than in the general population. Polypharmacy was seen in 34 % of prescribed patients in 2008. Additional studies examining use, efficacy, and long-term safety of antipsychotics and psychostimulants in autistic individuals are warranted.

PMID:
23681164
PMCID:
PMC3932167
DOI:
10.1007/s00213-013-3140-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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