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World J Pediatr. 2013 May;9(2):169-74. doi: 10.1007/s12519-013-0416-2. Epub 2013 May 16.

Trampoline related injuries in children: risk factors and radiographic findings.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. peter.klimek@ksa.ch

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Backyard trampolines are immensely popular among children, but are associated with an increase of trampoline-related injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate radiographs of children with trampoline related injuries and to determine the risk factors.

METHODS:

Between 2003 and 2009, 286 children under the age of 16 with backyard trampoline injuries were included in the study. The number of injuries increased from 13 patients in 2003 to 86 in 2009. The median age of the 286 patients was 7 years (range: 1-15 years). Totally 140 (49%) patients were males, and 146 (51%) females. Medical records and all available diagnostic imaging were reviewed. A questionnaire was sent to the parents to evaluate the circumstances of each injury, the type of trampoline, the protection equipment and the experience of the children using the trampoline. The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of the University Hospital of Bern.

RESULTS:

The questionnaires and radiographs of the 104 patients were available for evaluation. A fracture was sustained in 51 of the 104 patients. More than 75% of all patients sustaining injuries and in 90% of patients with fractures were jumping on the trampoline with other children at the time of the accident. The most common fractures were supracondylar humeral fractures (29%) and forearm fractures (25%). Fractures of the proximal tibia occurred especially in younger children between 2-5 years of age.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children younger than 5 years old are at risk for specific proximal tibia fractures ("Trampoline Fracture"). A child jumping simultaneously with other children has a higher risk of suffering from a fracture.

PMID:
23677833
DOI:
10.1007/s12519-013-0416-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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