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Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi. 2013 May;15(5):332-4.

[Relationship of B/A ratio and acidosis with abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potentials in neonates with severe hyperbilirubinemia].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

  • 1Department of Neonatology, Hunan Children's Hospital, Changsha 410007, China. lyn288@yahoo.cn

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the relationship of bilirubin/albumin (B/A) ratio and acidosis with abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) in neonates with severe hyperbilirubinemia and its clinical significance.

METHODS:

A total of 967 neonates with severe hyperbilirubinemia between November 2008 and October 2009 were enrolled in the study. They were divided into two groups according to their BAEPs: normal BAEP group (n=799) and abnormal BAEP group (n=168). Univariate analysis and age-stratified Chi-square test were used to determine the relationship of B/A ratio and acidosis with BAEP.

RESULTS:

The univariate analysis showed that the abnormal BAEP group had significantly lower pH and base excess values and a significantly higher B/A ratio compared with the normal BAEP group (P<0.05). The age-stratified Chi-square test showed that neonates with acidosis or with a B/A ratio greater than 1.0 had a significantly higher incidence of abnormal BAEPs than those without acidosis or with a B/A ratio less than 1.0 in any age (days) group of neonates with severe hyperbilirubinemia (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

High B/A ratio and acidosis are the risk factors for abnormal BAEPs in neonates with severe hyperbilirubinemia, which is the case for those in any age group. In order to reduce the incidence of hearing loss in any age group of neonates with severe hyperbilirubinemia, we should correct the acidosis and lower the B/A ratio as soon as possible.

PMID:
23676931
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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