Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Chest. 2013 Sep;144(3):859-865. doi: 10.1378/chest.13-0167.

Usefulness of cardiothoracic chest ultrasound in the management of acute respiratory failure in critical care practice.

Author information

1
Réanimation Polyvalente et Médecine Hyperbare, CHU Purpan; Pôle Anesthésie-Réanimation, CHU Purpan; Equipe d'Accueil, MATN, IFR 150, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France. Electronic address: silvastein@me.com.
2
Pôle Cardiovasculaire et Métabolique, CHU Rangueil.
3
Réanimation Polyvalente et Médecine Hyperbare, CHU Purpan; Pôle Anesthésie-Réanimation, CHU Purpan.
4
Pôle Anesthésie-Réanimation, CHU Purpan.
5
Pôle Anesthésie-Réanimation, CHU Purpan; Equipe d'Accueil, MATN, IFR 150, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study investigated the clinical relevance of early general chest ultrasonography (ie, heart and lung recordings) in patients in the ICU with acute respiratory failure (ARF).

METHODS:

We prospectively compared this diagnostic approach (ultrasound) to a routine evaluation established from clinical, radiologic, and biologic data (standard). Subjects were patients consecutively admitted to the ICU of a university teaching hospital during a 1-year period. Inclusion criteria were age ≥ 18 years and the presence of severe ARF criteria to justify ICU admission. We compared the diagnostic approaches and the final diagnosis determined by a panel of experts.

RESULTS:

Seventy-eight patients were included (age, 70 ± 18 years; sex ratio, 1). Three patients given two or more simultaneous diagnoses were subsequently excluded. The ultrasound approach was more accurate than the standard approach (83% vs 63%, respectively; P < .02). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed greater diagnostic performance of ultrasound in cases of pneumonia (standard, 0.74 ± 0.12; ultrasound, 0.87 ± 0.14; P < .02), acute hemodynamic pulmonary edema (standard, 0.79 ± 0.11; ultrasound, 0.93 ± 0.08; P < .007), decompensated COPD (standard, 0.8 ± 0.09; ultrasound, 0.92 ± 0.15; P < .05), and pulmonary embolism (standard, 0.65 ± 0.12; ultrasound, 0.81 ± 0.17; P < .04). Furthermore, we found that the use of ultrasound data could have significantly improved the initial treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

The use of cardiothoracic ultrasound appears to be an attractive complementary diagnostic tool and seems able to contribute to an early therapeutic decision based on reproducible physiopathologic data.

PMID:
23670087
DOI:
10.1378/chest.13-0167
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center