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Emerg Med J. 2014 Jul;31(7):545-548. doi: 10.1136/emermed-2012-202095. Epub 2013 May 10.

Using a mobile app and mobile workforce to validate data about emergency public health resources.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
3
The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
4
Gigwalk, San Francisco, California, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Social media and mobile applications that allow people to work anywhere are changing the way people can contribute and collaborate.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to determine the feasibility of using mobile workforce technology to validate the locations of automated external defibrillators (AEDs), an emergency public health resource.

METHODS:

We piloted the use of a mobile workforce application, to verify the location of 40 AEDs in Philadelphia county. AEDs were pre-identified in public locations for baseline data. The task of locating AEDs was posted online for a mobile workforce from October 2011 to January 2012. Participants were required to submit a mobile phone photo of AEDs and descriptions of the location.

RESULTS:

Thirty-five of the 40 AEDs were identified within the study period. Most, 91% (32/35) of the submitted AED photo information was confirmed project baseline data. Participants also provided additional data such as business hours and other nearby AEDs.

CONCLUSIONS:

It is feasible to engage a mobile workforce to complete health research-related tasks. Participants were able to validate information about emergency public health resources.

KEYWORDS:

cardiac arrest; research, methods

PMID:
23666486
PMCID:
PMC3883991
DOI:
10.1136/emermed-2012-202095
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

ACL, OS, HG, SH, JCH: nothing to disclose. AMC supported by award number 1K12HL108974-02 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. LBB: speaker honoraria/consultant fees: Philips Healthcare, Seattle, Washington; institutional grant/research support: Philips Healthcare, Seattle, Washington; Laerdal Medical, Stavanger, Norway; NIH, Bethesda, Maryland; Cardiac Science, Bothell, Washington. DAA: US government employee. RMM: grant/research support: NIH, K23 grant 10714038, pilot funding: Physio-Control Seattle, Washington; Zoll Medical, Boston Maryland; Cardiac Science, Bothell, Washington; Philips Medical Seattle, Washington. AS: Gigwalk co-founder.

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