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Br J Sports Med. 2014 Oct;48(20):1472-6. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2012-091721. Epub 2013 May 10.

Individual variability in compensatory eating following acute exercise in overweight and obese women.

Author information

1
Department of Sport, Health & Nutrition, Leeds Trinity University, Leeds, UK BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
2
BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
3
Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

While compensatory eating following acute aerobic exercise is highly variable, little is known about the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the alterations in exercise-induced eating behaviour.

METHODS:

Overweight and obese women (body mass index=29.6±4.0 kg/m(2)) performed a bout of cycling individually tailored to expend 400 kcal (EX) or a time-matched no exercise control condition in a randomised, counter-balanced order. 60 min after the cessation of exercise, an ad libitum test meal was provided. Substrate oxidation and subjective appetite ratings were measured during exercise/time-matched rest, and during the period between the cessation of exercise and food consumption.

RESULTS:

While ad libitum energy intake (EI) did not differ between EX and the control condition (666.0±203.9 vs 664.6±174.4 kcal, respectively; ns), there was a marked individual variability in compensatory EI. The difference in EI between EX and the control condition ranged from -234.3 to 278.5 kcal. Carbohydrate oxidation during exercise was positively associated with postexercise EI, accounting for 37% of the variance in EI (r=0.57; p=0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

These data indicate that the capacity of acute exercise to create a short-term energy deficit in overweight and obese women is highly variable. Furthermore, exercise-induced CHO oxidation can explain a part of the variability in acute exercise-induced compensatory eating. Postexercise compensatory eating could serve as an adaptive response to facilitate the restoration of carbohydrate balance.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise and/or caloric restriction effects on body weight/composition

PMID:
23666018
DOI:
10.1136/bjsports-2012-091721
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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