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Science. 2013 May 10;340(6133):701-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1233028.

Cellular self-defense: how cell-autonomous immunity protects against pathogens.

Author information

1
Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Division of Protein and Nucleic Acid Chemistry, Cambridge, UK. randow@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk

Abstract

Our prevailing view of vertebrate host defense is strongly shaped by the notion of a specialized set of immune cells as sole guardians of antimicrobial resistance. Yet this view greatly underestimates a capacity for most cell lineages-the majority of which fall outside the traditional province of the immune system-to defend themselves against infection. This ancient and ubiquitous form of host protection is termed cell-autonomous immunity and operates across all three domains of life. Here, we discuss the organizing principles that govern cellular self-defense and how intracellular compartmentalization has shaped its activities to provide effective protection against a wide variety of microbial pathogens.

PMID:
23661752
PMCID:
PMC3863583
DOI:
10.1126/science.1233028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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