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Surg Endosc. 2013 Jul;27(7):2253-7. doi: 10.1007/s00464-013-2973-9. Epub 2013 May 10.

Minimally invasive surgery: national trends in adoption and future directions for hospital strategy.

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1
Technology Insights Group, The Advisory Board Company, 2445 M St. NW, Washington, DC 20037, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Surgeons have rapidly adopted minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques for a wide range of applications since the first laparoscopic appendectomy was performed in 1983. At the helm of this MIS shift has been laparoscopy, with robotic surgery also gaining ground in a number of areas.

METHODS:

Researchers estimated national volumes, growth forecasts, and MIS adoption rates for the following procedures: cholecystectomy, appendectomy, gastric bypass, ventral hernia repair, colectomy, prostatectomy, tubal ligation, hysterectomy, and myomectomy. MIS adoption rates are based on secondary research, interviews with clinicians and administrators involved in MIS, and a review of clinical literature, where available. Overall volume estimates and growth forecasts are sourced from The Advisory Board Company's national demand model which provides current and future utilization rate projections for inpatient and outpatient services. The model takes into account demographics (growth and aging of the population) as well as non demographic factors such as inpatient to outpatient shift, increase in disease prevalence, technological advancements, coverage expansion, and changing payment models.

RESULTS:

Surgeons perform cholecystectomy, a relatively simple procedure, laparoscopically in 96 % of the cases. Use of the robot as a tool in laparoscopy is gaining traction in general surgery and seeing particular growth within colorectal surgery. Surgeons use robotic surgery in 15 % of colectomy cases, far behind that of prostatectomy but similar to that of hysterectomy, which have robotic adoption rates of 90 and 20 %, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Surgeons are using minimally invasive surgical techniques, primarily laparoscopy and robotic surgery, to perform procedures that were previously done as open surgery. As risk-based pressures mount, hospital executives will increasingly scrutinize the cost of new technology and the impact it has on patient outcomes. These changing market dynamics may thwart the expansion of new surgical techniques and heighten emphasis on competency standards.

PMID:
23660720
DOI:
10.1007/s00464-013-2973-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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