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Biol Lett. 2013 May 8;9(4):20130241. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2013.0241. Print 2013 Aug 23.

Extremely high frequency sensitivity in a 'simple' ear.

Author information

1
Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK. hannah.m.moir@gmail.com

Abstract

An evolutionary war is being played out between the bat, which uses ultrasonic calls to locate insect prey, and the moth, which uses microscale ears to listen for the approaching bat. While the highest known frequency of bat echolocation calls is 212 kHz, the upper limit of moth hearing is considered much lower. Here, we show that the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella, is capable of hearing ultrasonic frequencies approaching 300 kHz; the highest frequency sensitivity of any animal. With auditory frequency sensitivity that is unprecedented in the animal kingdom, the greater wax moth is ready and armed for any echolocation call adaptations made by the bat in the on-going bat-moth evolutionary war.

KEYWORDS:

Galleria mellonella; bioacoustics; electrophysiology; hearing; laser Doppler vibrometry; tympanal organ

PMID:
23658005
PMCID:
PMC3730633
DOI:
10.1098/rsbl.2013.0241
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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