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J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1990 Jul;72(6):905-9.

The influence of walking mechanics and time on the results of proximal tibial osteotomy.

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1
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60612.

Abstract

The current study describes the influence of the passage of time on the original findings. The mechanisms used by some patients to reduce loading at the knee (adduction moment) also were analyzed. We evaluated the gait of twenty-seven patients (thirty-two knees) who had had a proximal tibial osteotomy for a varus gonarthrosis. Twenty-four patients (twenty-eight knees) returned for follow-up at three to 8.9 years after the osteotomy. This is a follow-up to our original study (Prodromos et al.), which described a relationship between the magnitude of the adduction moment at the knee during walking and the outcome of proximal tibial osteotomy. The patients were divided into low and high adduction-moment groups on the basis of the magnitude of the adduction moment at the knee as measured preoperatively during walking. All fourteen patients in the low adduction-moment group and nine of the fourteen patients in the high adduction-moment group had a good or excellent result. The varus deformity recurred in ten patients in the high adduction-moment group and in three patients in the low adduction-moment group. All of the results degenerated over time. The adaptive mechanism that was used to lower the adduction moment during gait included shortening the stride and toeing-out. The significant correlation between the magnitudes of the inversion moment at the ankle and the adduction moment at the knee suggested that the toe-out gait reduced the adduction moment at the knee.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
2365722
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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