Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Nutr Biochem. 2013 Oct;24(10):1717-23. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2013.02.012. Epub 2013 May 3.

Antioxidant system response is modified by dietary fat in adipose tissue of metabolic syndrome patients.

Author information

1
Lipids and Atherosclerosis Research Unit, IMIBIC/Reina Sofia University Hospital/University of Cordoba. Cordoba 14004, Spain; CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutricion (CIBERobn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain.

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with high oxidative stress, which is caused by an increased expression of NADPH-oxidase and a decreased expression of antioxidant enzymes in the adipose tissue. Our aim was to evaluate whether the quality and quantity of dietary fat can modify that process. A randomized, controlled trial conducted within the LIPGENE study assigned MetS patients to one of four diets for 12 wk each: (i) high-saturated fatty acid (HSFA), (ii) high-monounsaturated fatty acid (HMUFA), (iii) and (iv) two low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diet supplemented with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LFHCC n3), or placebo (LFHCC). A fat challenge reflecting the same fatty acid composition as the original diets was conducted post-intervention. The intake of an HSFA meal induced a higher postprandial increase in gp91phox and p67phox mRNA levels than after the intake of HMUFA, LFHCC and LFHCC n-3 meals (all p-values<0.05). The postprandial decrease in CAT, GPXs and TXNRD1 mRNA levels after the HSFA meal intake was higher than after the intake of HMUFA, LFHCC and LFHCC n-3 meals (all p-values<0.05). The intake of an HSFA meal induced a higher postprandial increase in KEAP1 mRNA levels than after the consumption of the HMUFA (P=.007) and LFHCC n-3 (P=.001) meals. Our study demonstrated that monounsaturated fat consumption reduces oxidative stress as compared to saturated fat by inducing higher postprandial antioxidant response in adipose tissue, and thus, replacing SFA for MUFA may be an effective dietary strategy to reduce the oxidative stress in MetS patients and its pathophysiological consequences.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00429195.

KEYWORDS:

Adipose tissue; Antioxidant enzymes; Diet; LIPGENE study; Metabolic syndrome; Oxidative stress

PMID:
23647888
DOI:
10.1016/j.jnutbio.2013.02.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center