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Respir Med. 2013 Jul;107(7):1073-8. doi: 10.1016/j.rmed.2013.03.011. Epub 2013 May 3.

An electronic nose discriminates exhaled breath of patients with untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis from controls.

Author information

  • 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. sdragonieri@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown cause that affects the lungs in over 90% of cases. Breath analysis by electronic nose technology provides exhaled molecular profiles that have potential in the diagnosis of several respiratory diseases.

OBJECTIVES:

We hypothesized that exhaled molecular profiling may distinguish well-characterized patients with sarcoidosis from controls. To that end we performed electronic nose measurements in untreated and treated sarcoidosis patients and in healthy controls.

METHODS:

31 sarcoidosis patients (11 patients with untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis [age: 48.4 ± 9.0], 20 patients with treated pulmonary sarcoidosis [age: 49.7 ± 7.9]) and 25 healthy controls (age: 39.6 ± 14.1) participated in a cross-sectional study. Exhaled breath was collected twice using a Tedlar bag by a standardized method. Both bags were then sampled by an electronic nose (Cyranose C320), resulting in duplicate data. Statistical analysis on sensor responses was performed off-line by principal components (PC) analyses, discriminant analysis and ROC curves.

RESULTS:

Breathprints from patients with untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis were discriminated from healthy controls (CVA: 83.3%; AUC 0.825). Repeated measurements confirmed those results. Patients with untreated and treated sarcoidosis could be less well discriminated (CVA 74.2%), whereas the treated sarcoidosis group was undistinguishable from controls (CVA 66.7%)

CONCLUSION:

Untreated patients with active sarcoidosis can be discriminated from healthy controls. This suggests that exhaled breath analysis has potential for diagnosis and/or monitoring of sarcoidosis.

PMID:
23647864
DOI:
10.1016/j.rmed.2013.03.011
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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