Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Appl Biomech. 2013 Apr;29(2):141-6.

Runners with anterior knee pain use a greater percentage of their available pronation range of motion.

Author information

1
Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA.

Abstract

"Excessive" pronation is often implicated as a risk factor for anterior knee pain (AKP). The amount deemed excessive is typically calculated using the means and standard deviations reported in the literature. However, when using this method, few studies find an association between pronation and AKP. An alternative method of defining excessive pronation is to use the joints' available range of motion (ROM). The purposes of this study were to (1) evaluate pronation in the context of the joints' ROM and (2) compare this method to traditional pronation variables in healthy and injured runners. Thirty-six runners (19 healthy, 17 AKP) had their passive pronation ROM measured using a custom-built device and a motion capture system. Dynamic pronation angles during running were captured and compared with the available ROM. In addition, traditional pronation variables were evaluated. No significant differences in traditional pronation variables were noted between healthy and injured runners. In contrast, injured runners used significantly more of their available ROM, maintaining a 4.21° eversion buffer, whereas healthy runners maintained a 7.25° buffer (P = .03, ES = 0.77). Defining excessive pronation in the context of the joints' available ROM may be a better method of defining excessive pronation and distinguishing those at risk for injury.

PMID:
23645486
DOI:
10.1123/jab.29.2.141
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Sheridan PubFactory
Loading ...
Support Center