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Asian J Psychiatr. 2013 Jun;6(3):266-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ajp.2013.04.001. Epub 2013 Apr 19.

Psychotic disorders in DSM-5: summary of changes.

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1
Department of Psychiatry and Pharmacology, Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. wcarpent@mprc.umaryland.edu

Abstract

Key issues related to the diagnosis of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders addressed in DSM-5 were more precisely defining diagnostic boundaries between different psychotic disorders, reducing spurious comorbidity, improving coherence across the diagnostic manual, and enhancing validity without loss of reliability. New information about the nature of these disorders generated since DSM-IV was incorporated into their definition. Resulting changes in DSM-5 include elimination of the classic subtypes of schizophrenia, elimination of special treatment of Schneiderian 'first-rank symptoms', more precise delineation of schizoaffective disorder from schizophrenia and psychotic mood disorders, and clarification of the nosologic status of catatonia and its consistent treatment across the manual. Changes in section 3 of the manual include addition of a new category of "attenuated psychosis syndrome" as a condition for further study and addition of unique psychopathological dimensions (that represent treatment targets across disorders). The specific nature of these revisions in the DSM-5 criteria for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders along with their rationale are summarized in this article.

PMID:
23642992
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajp.2013.04.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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