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Am J Bioeth. 2013;13(6):38-45. doi: 10.1080/15265161.2013.781703.

Toward a more stable blood supply: charitable incentives, donation rates, and the experience of September 11.

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1
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH 44106, USA. rgs63@case.edu

Abstract

Although excess blood collection has characterized U.S. national disasters, most dramatically in the case of September 11, periodic shortages of blood have recurred for decades. In response, I propose a new model of medical philanthropy, one that specifically uses charitable contributions to health care as blood donation incentives. I explain how the surge in blood donations following 9/11 was both transient and disaster-specific, failing to foster a greater continuing commitment to donate blood. This underscores the importance of considering blood donation incentives. I defend charitable incentives as an alternative to financial incentives, which I contend would further extend neoliberal market values into health care. I explain my model's potential appeal to private foundations or public-private partnerships as a means for expanding both the pool of blood donors and the prosocial benefit of each act of blood donation. Finally I link my analysis to the empirical literature on blood donation incentives.

PMID:
23641850
DOI:
10.1080/15265161.2013.781703
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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