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Sex Health. 2013 Aug;10(4):291-8. doi: 10.1071/SH12142.

Men who have sex with men, infectious syphilis and HIV coinfection in inner Sydney: results of enhanced surveillance.

Author information

1
Public Health Unit, South Eastern Sydney Local Health District, Locked Bag 88, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia.

Abstract

Background The resurgence of infectious syphilis in men who have sex with men (MSM) has been documented worldwide; however, HIV coinfection and syphilis reinfections in MSM in inner Sydney have not been published.

METHODS:

For all laboratory syphilis notifications assessed as a newly notified case or reinfection, a questionnaire was sent to the requesting physician seeking demographic data and disease classification. Sex of partner and HIV status were collected for all infectious syphilis notifications in men received from 1 April 2006 to March 2011.

RESULTS:

From April 2001 to March 2011, 3664 new notifications were received, 2278 (62%) were classified as infectious syphilis. Infectious syphilis notifications increased 12-fold from 25 to 303 in the first and last year respectively, and almost all notifications were in men (2220, 97.5%). During April 2006 to March 2011, 1562 infectious syphilis notifications in males were received and 765 (49%) of these men were HIV-positive and 1351 (86%) reported a male sex partner. Reinfections increased over time from 17 (9%) to 56 (19%) in the last year of the study and were significantly more likely to be in HIV-positive individuals (χ(2)=140.92, degrees of freedom= 1, P=<0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Inner Sydney is experiencing an epidemic of infectious syphilis in MSM and about half of these cases are in HIV-positive patients. Reinfections are increasing and occur predominantly in HIV-positive men. Accurate surveillance information is needed to inform effective prevention programs, and community and clinician education needs to continue until a sustained reduction is achieved.

PMID:
23639847
DOI:
10.1071/SH12142
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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