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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2014 Jan;147(1):451-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2013.03.032. Epub 2013 Apr 30.

Long-term follow-up evaluation of renal function in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis after cardiac surgery for correction of congenital anomalies.

Author information

1
Institute of Pediatric Nephrology, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petach Tikva, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. Electronic address: cicu_schneider@clalit.org.il.
2
Institute of Pediatric Nephrology, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petach Tikva, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
3
Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petach Tikva, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Available data on the long-term renal outcome of patients who required renal replacement therapy after cardiac surgery for correction of congenital cardiac anomalies are scarce. The aim of the present study was to investigate the long-term renal prognosis of children treated with peritoneal dialysis after surgical correction of congenital heart anomalies.

METHODS:

The present single-center cohort study was based on clinical data from patients who underwent surgery for the correction of congenital heart disease between 1996 and 2004 at the Schneider's Children's Medical Center of Israel, and developed acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring peritoneal dialysis. Perioperative risk factors were analyzed. Survivors were followed up for 3.5 to 10.5 years after their surgery. Renal function was assessed in survivors by physical examination, including blood pressure, growth evaluation, urinalysis, glomerular filtration rate estimated from plasma creatinine using the Schwartz formula, and ultrasonographic examination of the kidneys.

RESULTS:

There were 2994 children who underwent surgery during the study period. Eighty-four children (2.84%) developed postoperative AKI that was managed with peritoneal dialysis. Seventy-six children were included in our study, 8 were excluded because of a lack of complete data. Of the 76 children included, 35 died during the immediate postoperative period, 15 died during the interim of nonrenal causes, and 26 were alive at the time of follow-up evaluation. Twenty-five patients with a complete evaluation had blood pressure measurements in the normal range. Plasma creatinine levels were normal for age. Only 1 child, who had a pre-existing congenital renal anomaly, had an abnormal glomerular filtration rate. None of the children had proteinuria. Three children were treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and 2 were treated with furosemide for congestive heart failure. We found no risk factors associated with immediate postoperative death.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite the development of AKI requiring dialysis after surgical correction of congenital cardiac anomalies, the long-term renal prognosis in survivors is good.

KEYWORDS:

20; 21; 41.1; 41.3; AKI; GFR; acute kidney injury; glomerular filtration rate; pRIFLE; pediatric risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage renal disease

PMID:
23639428
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2013.03.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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