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Physiology (Bethesda). 2013 May;28(3):151-63. doi: 10.1152/physiol.00052.2012.

Nogo-A represses anatomical and synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system.

Author information

1
Brain Research Institute, University of Zurich, Switzerland. kempf@hifo.uzh.ch

Abstract

Nogo-A was initially discovered as a myelin-associated growth inhibitory protein limiting axonal regeneration after central nervous system (CNS) injury. This review summarizes current knowledge on how myelin and neuronal Nogo-A and its receptors exert physiological functions ranging from the regulation of growth suppression to synaptic plasticity in the developing and adult intact CNS.

PMID:
23636261
DOI:
10.1152/physiol.00052.2012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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