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Cancer Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;37(4):479-91. doi: 10.1016/j.canep.2013.03.010. Epub 2013 Apr 28.

Effects of polymorphisms in alcohol metabolism and oxidative stress genes on survival from head and neck cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. ahakenewerth@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Heavy alcohol consumption increases risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Alcohol metabolism to cytotoxic and mutagenic intermediates acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species is critical for alcohol-drinking-associated carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in alcohol metabolism-related and antioxidant genes influence SCCHN survival.

METHODS:

Interview and genotyping data (64 polymorphisms in 12 genes) were obtained from 1227 white and African-American cases from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology study, a population-based case-control study of SCCHN conducted in North Carolina from 2002 to 2006. Vital status, date and cause of death through 2009 were obtained from the National Death Index. Kaplan-Meier log-rank tests and adjusted hazard ratios were calculated to identify alleles associated with survival.

RESULTS:

Most tested SNPs were not associated with survival, with the exception of the minor alleles of rs3813865 and rs8192772 in CYP2E1. These were associated with poorer cancer-specific survival (HRrs3813865, 95% CI=2.00, 1.33-3.01; HRrs8192772, 95% CI=1.62, 1.17-2.23). Hazard ratios for 8 additional SNPs in CYP2E1, GPx2, SOD1, and SOD2, though not statistically significant, were suggestive of differences in allele hazards for all-cause and/or cancer death. No consistent associations with survival were found for SNPs in ADH1B, ADH1C, ADH4, ADH7, ALDH2, GPx2, GPx4, and CAT.

CONCLUSIONS:

We identified some polymorphisms in alcohol and oxidative stress metabolism genes that influence survival in subjects with SCCHN. Previously unreported associations of SNPs in CYP2E1 warrant further investigation.

PMID:
23632049
PMCID:
PMC3725265
DOI:
10.1016/j.canep.2013.03.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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