Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Apr;19(4):623-9. doi: 10.3201/eid1904.121353.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization of the groin and risk for clinical infection among HIV-infected adults.

Author information

1
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. pjpeters@cdc.gov

Abstract

Data on the interaction between methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization and clinical infection are limited. During 2007-2008, we enrolled HIV-infected adults in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, in a prospective cohort study. Nares and groin swab specimens were cultured for S. aureus at enrollment and after 6 and 12 months. MRSA colonization was detected in 13%-15% of HIV-infected participants (n=600, 98% male) at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. MRSA colonization was detected in the nares only (41%), groin only (21%), and at both sites (38%). Over a median of 2.1 years of follow-up, 29 MRSA clinical infections occurred in 25 participants. In multivariate analysis, MRSA clinical infection was significantly associated with MRSA colonization of the groin (adjusted risk ratio 4.8) and a history of MRSA infection (adjusted risk ratio 3.1). MRSA prevention strategies that can effectively prevent or eliminate groin colonization are likely necessary to reduce clinical infections in this population.

KEYWORDS:

Georgia; HIV; MRSA; bacteria; colonization; methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; staphylococci; viruses

PMID:
23631854
PMCID:
PMC3647417
DOI:
10.3201/eid1904.121353
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for CDC-NCEZID Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center