Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2013 Apr 22;8(4):e61763. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0061763. Print 2013.

The risk of type 2 diabetes in men is synergistically affected by parental history of diabetes and overweight.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Interactions between genetic- and lifestyle factors may be of specific importance for the development of type 2 diabetes. Only a few earlier studies have evaluated interaction effects for the combination of family history of diabetes and presence of risk factors related to lifestyle. We explored whether 60-year-old men and women from Stockholm with a parental history of diabetes are more susceptible than their counterparts without a parental history of diabetes to the negative influence from physical inactivity, overweight or smoking regarding risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The study comprised 4232 participants of which 205 men and 113 women had diabetes (the vast majority type 2 diabetes considering the age of study participants) and 224 men and 115 women had prediabetes (fasting glucose 6.1-6.9 mmol/l). Prevalence odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Biologic interaction was analyzed using a Synergy index (S) score. The crude OR for type 2 diabetes associated with a parental history of diabetes was 2.4 (95% CI 1.7-3.5) in men and 1.4 (95% CI 0.9-2.3) in women. Adjustments for overweight, physical inactivity and current smoking had minimal effects on the association observed in men whereas in women it attenuated results. In men, but not in women, a significant interaction effect that synergistically increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes was observed for the combination of BMI>30 and a parental history of diabetes, S 2.4 (95% CI 1.1-5.1). No signs of interactions were noted for a parental history of diabetes combined with physical inactivity and smoking, respectively. In conclusion, obesity in combination with presence of a parental history of diabetes may be particularly hazardous in men as these two factors were observed to synergistically increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in men.

PMID:
23630613
PMCID:
PMC3632519
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0061763
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center