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J Hum Nutr Diet. 2013 Jul;26 Suppl 1:132-9. doi: 10.1111/jhn.12086. Epub 2013 Apr 30.

Stress management can facilitate weight loss in Greek overweight and obese women: a pilot study.

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1
Postgraduate Course Stress Management and Health Promotion, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Stress and negative emotions have been shown to be critical factors in inducing overeating as a form of maladaptive coping in obese people.

METHODS:

The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of an 8-week stress management programme that includes progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and diaphragmatic breathing on weight loss and eating behaviour in a sample of overweight and obese women who started a weight-loss programme. A total of 34 women with a mean (SD) body mass index of 38.17 (7.19) kg m(-) ² and mean (SD) age 47.35 (11.64) years were recruited from the outpatients Obesity Clinic of a public hospital in Athens. Participants were randomly assigned into a Stress Management (SM) and a control group. Anthropometric measurements were taken before and after the intervention, and the participants completed the following questionnaires: Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (DEBQ), Eating Attitudes Test (Eat-26), Health Locus of Control (HLC) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) before and after the intervention.

RESULTS:

The findings indicated a significant improvement in weight loss in the SM group [4.44 (0.83) kg] after intervention compared to the control group [1.38 (0.78) kg] (P < 0.05). A higher restrained eating behaviour was observed in the SM group after intervention compared to the control group, although there was no significant difference in perceived stress levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

The intervention group showed greater weight reduction, possibly because of the stress management programme, and a greater dietary restraint was demonstrated by them compared to the control group. It is likely that stress management could facilitate weight loss in obese women; however, more studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

PMID:
23627835
DOI:
10.1111/jhn.12086
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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