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Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 May 1;54(5):3673-80. doi: 10.1167/iovs.12-10672.

Adaptive optics imaging of geographic atrophy.

Author information

1
Clinical Investigation Center 503, Centre Hospitalier National des Quinze-Vingts, Institute National de la Santé, et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6, Paris, France.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To report the findings of en face adaptive optics (AO) near infrared (NIR) reflectance fundus flood imaging in eyes with geographic atrophy (GA).

METHODS:

Observational clinical study of AO NIR fundus imaging was performed in 12 eyes of nine patients with GA, and in seven controls using a flood illumination camera operating at 840 nm, in addition to routine clinical examination. To document short term and midterm changes, AO imaging sessions were repeated in four patients (mean interval between sessions 21 days; median follow up 6 months).

RESULTS:

As compared with scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging, AO NIR imaging improved the resolution of the changes affecting the RPE. Multiple hyporeflective clumps were seen within and around GA areas. Time-lapse imaging revealed micrometric-scale details of the emergence and progression of areas of atrophy as well as the complex kinetics of some hyporeflective clumps. Such dynamic changes were observed within as well as outside atrophic areas.

CONCLUSIONS:

in eyes affected by GA, AO nir imaging allows high resolution documentation of the extent of RPE damage. this also revealed that a complex, dynamic process of redistribution of hyporeflective clumps throughout the posterior pole precedes and accompanies the emergence and progression of atrophy. therefore, these clumps are probably also a biomarker of rpe damage. AO NIR imaging may, therefore, be of interest to detect the earliest stages, to document the retinal pathology and to monitor the progression oF GA. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01546181.).

KEYWORDS:

adaptive optics; geographic atrophy; infrared imaging; retinal pigment epithelium

PMID:
23620431
DOI:
10.1167/iovs.12-10672
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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