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Cell Death Dis. 2013 Apr 25;4:e611. doi: 10.1038/cddis.2013.135.

Calcium-activated and apoptotic phospholipid scrambling induced by Ano6 can occur independently of Ano6 ion currents.

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1
Institut für Physiologie, Universität Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany.

Abstract

Immune cells and platelets maintain plasma membrane phospholipid asymmetry. Upon activation, this asymmetry is disrupted by phospholipid scrambling (PS), which is a major step during activation of immune cells, hemostasis and apoptosis. Anoctamin 6 (Ano6; TMEM16F) causes chloride (Cl(-)) and cation currents and is required for Ca(2+)-dependent PS. It is defective in blood cells from patients with Scott syndrome, a rare bleeding disorder. We examined if Cl(-) currents and PS are related, whether both processes are Ca(2+) dependent, and whether Ca(2+)-independent scrambling during intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis is controlled by Ano6. Ca(2+) increase by ionomycin activated Ano6 Cl(-) currents and PS in normal lymphocytes, but not in B-lymphocytes from two different patients with Scott syndrome. Fas ligand (FasL) did not increase intracellular Ca(2+), but activated Cl(-) currents in normal but not in Scott lymphocytes. Whole-cell currents were inhibited by Cl(-) channel blockers and by siRNA knockdown of Ano6. In contrast, intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis by ABT-737 did not induce Cl(-) currents in lymphocytes. PS was not inhibited by blockers of Ano6 or removal of Cl(-) ions. Remarkably, Ca(2+)-independent scrambling due to extrinsic (FasL) or intrinsic (ABT-737) apoptosis was unchanged in Scott cells. We conclude that: (i) Ano6 Cl(-) currents are activated by increase in cytosolic Ca(2+), or Ca(2+) independent by stimulation of Fas receptors; (ii) Ca(2+)-dependent PS induced by Ano6 does not require Cl(-) currents; (iii) Ca(2+)-independent PS does not require Ano6; (iv) Ano6 is necessary for Ca(2+)-dependent PS, but not by increasing intracellular Ca(2+).

PMID:
23618909
PMCID:
PMC3668637
DOI:
10.1038/cddis.2013.135
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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