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PLoS One. 2013 Apr 16;8(4):e61799. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0061799. Print 2013.

Macrophage depletion impairs corneal wound healing after autologous transplantation in mice.

Author information

1
Qingdao University, Qingdao, China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Macrophages have been shown to play a critical role in the wound healing process. In the present study, the role of macrophages in wound healing after autologous corneal transplantation was investigated by depleting local infiltrated macrophages.

METHODS:

Autologous corneal transplantation model was used to induce wound repair in Balb/c mice. Macrophages were depleted by sub-conjunctival injections of clodronate-containing liposomes (Cl2MDP-LIP). The presence of CD11b(+) F4/80(+) macrophages, α-smooth muscle actin(+) (α-SMA(+)) myofibroblasts, CD31(+) vascular endothelial cells and NG2 (+) pericytes was examined by immunohistochemical and corneal whole-mount staining 14 days after penetrating keratoplasty. Peritoneal macrophages were isolated from Balb/c mice and transfused into conjunctiva to examine the recovery role of macrophages depletion on wound healing after autologous corneal transplantation.

RESULTS:

Sub-conjunctival Cl2MDP-LIP injection significantly depleted the corneal resident phagocytes and infiltrated macrophages into corneal stroma. Compared with the mice injected with PBS-liposome, the Cl2MDP-LIP-injected mice showed few inflammatory cells, irregularly distributed extracellular matrix, ingrowth of corneal epithelium into stroma, and even the detachment of donor cornea from recipient. Moreover, the number of macrophages, myofibroblasts, endothelial cells and pericytes was also decreased in the junction area between the donor and recipient cornea in macrophage-depleted mice. Peritoneal macrophages transfusion recovered the defect of corneal wound healing caused by macrophages depletion.

CONCLUSIONS:

Macrophage depletion significantly impairs wound healing after autologous corneal transplantation through at least partially impacting on angiogenesis and wound closure.

PMID:
23613940
PMCID:
PMC3628839
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0061799
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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