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Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2013 Aug;52(8):739-46. doi: 10.1177/0009922813485284. Epub 2013 Apr 22.

Predicting anatomical urological abnormalities in children who present with their first urinary tract infection.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Classically, presence of fever≥38.0°C is used to distinguish pyelonephritis from cystitis. We analyzed whether this is an appropriate marker to initiate further workup and whether temperature is correlated with urological abnormalities and further surgical or pharmacological intervention.

METHODS:

Children who presented for their first workup of urinary tract infection between October 1, 2008, and September 30, 2009 were retrospectively selected from our institution. Demographics and clinical details were correlated with the diagnosis of urological abnormalities and requirement for intervention.

RESULTS:

Age was the most important variable to predict urological abnormalities. The temperature value of 38.3°C maximized the balance between sensitivity (90%) and specificity (46%) for predicting the need to intervene and the presence of anatomical urological abnormalities.

CONCLUSION:

Young age (≤2 years) and temperature are the best factors to predict further intervention and urological abnormalities, with a temperature value of 38.3°C being a better predictive value than the currently used 38.0°C.

KEYWORDS:

children; fever; urinary tract infection; vesicoureteral reflux

PMID:
23613178
DOI:
10.1177/0009922813485284
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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