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Int J Pharm. 2013 Dec 5;457(2):446-60. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2013.04.034. Epub 2013 Apr 21.

Food, physiology and drug delivery.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutics, UCL School of Pharmacy, University College London, WC1N 1AX, London, UK.

Abstract

Gastrointestinal physiology is dynamic and complex at the best of times, and a multitude of known variables can affect the overall bioavailability of drugs delivered via the oral route. Yet while the influences of food and beverage intake as just two of these variables on oral drug delivery have been extensively documented in the wider literature, specific information on their effects remains sporadic, and is not so much contextually reviewed. Food co-ingestion with oral dosage forms can mediate several changes to drug bioavailability, yet the precise mechanisms underlying this have yet to be fully elucidated. Likewise, the often detrimental effects of alcohol (ethanol) on dosage form performance have been widely observed experimentally, but knowledge of which has only moderately impacted on clinical practice. Here, we attempt to piece together the available subject matter relating to the influences of both solid and liquid foodstuffs on the gastrointestinal milieu and the implications for oral drug delivery, with particular emphasis on the behaviour of modified-release dosage forms, formulation robustness and drug absorption. Providing better insight into these influences, and exemplifying cases where formulations have been developed or modified to circumvent their associated problems, can help to appropriately direct the design of future in vitro digestive modelling systems as well as oral dosage forms resilient to these effects. Moreover, this will help to better our understanding of the impact of food and alcohol intake on normal gut behaviour and function.

KEYWORDS:

Biorelevant dynamic dissolution testing; Colonic drug delivery; Controlled release; Dose dumping; Enteric coatings; Pharmacokinetics

PMID:
23612358
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijpharm.2013.04.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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