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J Geriatr Cardiol. 2013 Mar;10(1):21-7. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1671-5411.2013.01.005.

Prevalence of and risk factors for aspirin resistance in elderly patients with coronary artery disease.

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1
First Geriatric Cardiology Division of South Building, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the prevalence of and related risk factors for aspirin resistance in elderly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).

METHODS:

Two hundred and forty-six elderly patients (75.9 ± 7.4 years) with CAD who received daily aspirin therapy (≥ 75 mg) over one month were recruited. The effect of aspirin was assessed using light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and thrombelastography platelet mapping assay (TEG). Aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 20% arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation and ≥ 70% adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation in the LTA assay. An aspirin semi-responder was defined as meeting one (but not both) of the criteria described above. Based on the results of TEG, aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 50% aggregation induced by AA.

RESULTS:

As determined by LTA, 23 (9.3%) of the elderly CAD patients were resistant to aspirin therapy; 91 (37.0%) were semi-responders. As determined by TEG, 61 patients (24.8%) were aspirin resistant. Of the 61 patients who were aspirin resistant by TEG, 19 were aspirin resistant according to LTA results. Twenty-four of 91 semi-responders by LTA were aspirin resistant by TEG. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that elevated fasting serum glucose level (Odds ratio: 1.517; 95% CI: 1.176-1.957; P = 0.001) was a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance as determined by TEG.

CONCLUSIONS:

A significant number of elderly patients with CAD are resistant to aspirin therapy. Fasting blood glucose level is closely associated with aspirin resistance in elderly CAD patients.

KEYWORDS:

Aspirin resistance; Coronary artery disease; Risk factors

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