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J Med Life. 2013 Mar 15;6(1):99-102. Epub 2013 Mar 25.

Umbilical hernia alloplastic dual-mesh treatment in cirrhotic patients.

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1
General Surgery Department, "Sf. Pantelimon" Emergency Hospital, Bucharest.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Abdominal wall hernias represent a pathology with an impressive prevalence among the population of patients with cirrhosis complicated by ascites. The aggressive surgical approach of umbilical hernia for patients with cirrhotic background remains a controversial problem, accompanied by anesthetic and surgical risk. Its indication remains fully justified in case of severe symptoms or life threatening complications: strangulation, incarceration, evisceration.

OBJECTIVE:

This article evaluates results obtained by using dual-mesh alloplastic materials for surgical treatment of umbilical hernias affecting cirrhotic patients with incipient liver injury.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Our lot consists of twelve patients with ages between 45 and 65 years, diagnosed with hepatic cirrhosis, without other associated comorbidities. All patients were admitted for strangulated umbilical hernia. Among the analyzed lot, no decease was encountered, the morbidity being limited to two cases of parietal suppuration, solved conservatively, without the mesh removal. There were no ascitic fistulas. No recurrences were registered for a 12 months tracking period.

DISCUSSION:

The presence of cirrhosis implies a high anesthetic and surgical risk, the intervention being grafted by a substantial increase of mortality and morbidity in an emergency setting. The development of new alloplastic materials, together with the modern anesthetic techniques, allows superior results for patients with incipient hepatic injury.

KEYWORDS:

alloplastic intraperitoneal repair; cirrhosis; complicated umbilical hernia

PMID:
23599831
PMCID:
PMC3624659
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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