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Rev Iberoam Micol. 2013 Oct-Dec;30(4):248-55. doi: 10.1016/j.riam.2013.02.004. Epub 2013 Apr 11.

Invasive infections caused by Saprochaete capitata in patients with haematological malignancies: report of five cases and review of the antifungal therapy.

Author information

1
Servicio de Hematología y Hemoterapia, BioCruces Health Research Institute, Hospital Universitario Cruces, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Saprochaete capitata (formerly known as Geotrichum capitatum and Blastoschizomyces capitatus) is a ubiquitous fungus found in soil, water, air, plants and dairy products. It colonizes the skin, and bronchial and intestinal tract of healthy people producing serious opportunistic infections in patients with haematological malignancies, especially in those with acute leukaemia. Since 1960s its presence is being increasingly recognized in this group of patients. The clinical spectrum of S. capitata disseminated infections is very similar to that produced by Candida, being easily misinterpreted. The associated high mortality and low susceptibility to fluconazole and echinocandins of S. capitata require the acknowledgement of this emergent infection so that it can be properly treated.

CASE REPORT:

We report 5 new cases of S. capitata disseminated infection in patients with advanced haematological malignancies observed in the haematology unit between the years 2004 and 2010, and review the state-of-the-art for diagnosis and treatment of this infection.

CONCLUSIONS:

Based on our experience, the prophylactic use of or the empirical antifungal treatment with fluconazole and/or echinocandins would not be adequate for oncohaematological patients in those hospitals where S. capitata infection may be highly prevalent.

KEYWORDS:

Antifungals; Antimicóticos; Blastoschizomyces capitatus; Cáncer hematológico; Diagnóstico molecular; Geotrichum capitatum; Haematological malignancies; Molecular diagnostics; Saprochaete capitata

PMID:
23583265
DOI:
10.1016/j.riam.2013.02.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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