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J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2013 Jun;11(6):710-2. doi: 10.3171/2013.3.PEDS12273. Epub 2013 Apr 12.

Vascular collateralization along ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheters in moyamoya disease.

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1
Department of Neurosurgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York, USA.

Abstract

Surgically created openings such as bur holes can serve as avenues for the development of collateral blood supply to the brain in patients with moyamoya disease. When such collateralization occurs through preexisting shunt catheter sites, the potential exists for perioperative stroke if these vessels are damaged during revision of a ventricular catheter for shunt malfunction. In this paper the authors report on a series of patients with a history of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts who later developed moyamoya disease and were found to have spontaneous transdural collateral vessels at ventricular catheter sites readily visualized on diagnostic angiography. A consecutive surgical series of 412 patients with moyamoya disease treated at Boston Children's Hospital from 1990 to 2010 were reviewed to identify patients with concomitant moyamoya and a VP shunt. The clinical records and angiograms of these patients were reviewed to determine the extent of bur hole collaterals through the shunt site. Three patients were identified who had VP shunts placed for hydrocephalus and subsequently developed moyamoya disease. All 3 patients demonstrated spontaneous transdural collaterals at the ventricular catheter bur hole, as confirmed by angiography during the workup for moyamoya disease. No patients required subsequent revision of their ventricular catheters following the diagnosis of moyamoya. All patients have remained stroke free and clinically stable following pial synangiosis. Although the association of moyamoya and shunted hydrocephalus is rare, it may present a significant potential problem for the neurosurgeon treating a shunt malfunction in this patient population, because shunt bur holes may become entry sites for the ingrowth of significant cortical transdural collateral blood supply to the underlying brain. Shunt revision might therefore be associated with an increased risk of postoperative stroke or operative-site hemorrhage in this population if this vascularization is interrupted when shunt catheters are removed and replaced. A knowledge of the existence of shunt-related collaterals in patients with moyamoya may aid the surgeon in planning shunt revisions and considering, for example, a new entry point for a ventricular catheter, rather than replacing an existing one, to minimize the risk of jeopardizing existing collaterals.

PMID:
23581637
DOI:
10.3171/2013.3.PEDS12273
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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